About

The Indiana Agriculture Nutrient Alliance’s primary objective is to improve education and awareness of effective best management practices. Because farmers are in the best position to determine the practices that are most appropriate on their own farms to achieve reductions in nutrient loss, the alliance will increase partnerships with existing programs to improve nutrient management and soil health and, ultimately, Indiana’s water quality.

Small changes, big impacts

This alliance will stretch across multiple years with three main objectives:

Goals Wheel

  1. Increase awareness among farmers that nutrient loss from soil to water is an issue and can be managed at the farm-level.
  2. Empower farmers to review and adopt new BMPs.
  3. Keep best management decisions in the hands of farmers.

The Indiana Agriculture Nutrient Alliance is dedicated to keeping Indiana at the forefront of proactive nutrient management and soil health practices that improve farm viability and, ultimately, reduce nutrient loss to water.

Currently, a portion of Indiana’s farmers participate in the following best management practices:

currently

50

Learn more about the alliance here.

Take the small steps needed today to protect Indiana’s natural resources and your bottom line for the right reason — leaving the land better than you found it for the next generation to work, live and prosper on the farm.


The alliance is brought to you by:

IANA Partners

Visit our partner pages to learn more about the organizations and agencies behind this initiative.


References

1Stalker Prokopy, L. and Ulrich-Schad. 2014. Understanding Nutrient Management Decisions: Examination of the Agricultural Community in Indiana. Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Natural Resources Social Science Lab.

2Singer, J. Cover Crops in the Corn Belt: Survey finds underused potential as conservation tool. Iowa State University. Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Accessed July 2015. Retrieved from: http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/news/leopold-letter/2006/winter/cover-crops-corn-belt-survey-finds-underused-potential-conservation-